Eat like a local in Tokyo

- discover unique Japanese cuisine -

Popular Restaurants
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Tsukiji Miyagawa Honten つきじ宮川本廛
AreasShinjuku
CusinesUnaju (Unagi),Sashimi
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Sushi Ken すし賢
AreasAsakusa
CusinesSashimi,Sushi
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Takara たから
AreasGotanda
CusinesYakitori,Mizutaki
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Hinauo 日菜魚
AreasKayabacho
CusinesSashimi
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Hanba 飯場
AreasGinza
CusinesTonkatsu,Kushiage
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Onyasai Ebisu 温野菜 恵比寿
AreasEbisu
CusinesWagyu beef,Shabu-shabu
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Onyasai Mitaka 温野菜 三鷹
AreasMitaka
CusinesWagyu beef,Shabu-shabu
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Guenpin Fugu 玄品ふぐ 銀座
AreasGinza
CusinesFugu

Selected Areas All Areas

Selected Cusines All Cusines

Fugu
is the famous poisonous fish that only licensed experts can prepare safely, and our restaurants will most certainly prepare it perfectly for you. Being sure to avoid the poison stored in its internal organs, chefs slice the fish up for raw consumption and also cook it up in a variety of ways. But more than just a delicious challenge, fugu is rich in collagen and protein, and also low in fat and calories!
Kushiage
is, simply put, deep fried food served on sticks, but it has been elevated to an art form by chefs in Japan. Various meats, seafood, and vegetables are skewered onto thin bamboo sticks, dipped into melted butter, coated with breadcrumbs, then deep-fried to a golden crisp. Immediately before eating, you should dip the stick into the provided Japanese-style BBQ sauce.
Mizutaki
is a hot pot dish originating in western Japan, but now popular all over the country. The clear broth gets its flavor from dried seaweed, or “konbu,” and it is in this broth that you cook your chicken (or sometimes other meats) and vegetables table-side. The soup gives a delicious, subtle, but still complex flavor profile. Once cooked, you take the items out of the pot, traditionally dipping them in a ponzu soy sauce before eating. The meal is generally ended with rice or noodles being added to the remaining soup, making for a satisfying finish to a hearty dinner.
Motsu Nabe
is a hot pot dish made with beef or pork innards. Traditionally, the soup is soy sauce based with some garlic and mild chili pepper, cabbage, and perhaps some other vegetable added in to ensure a good mix of flavors, but sometimes miso is used instead of a soy sauce base. Slow cooking ensures that the texture is not too tough and the flavors are as delicious as can be. After eating up all the delicious meat and vegetables, “champon” noodles are often put into the pot to complete the meal.
Oden
is a dish generally served in winter. Though the ingredients can vary by restaurant, the dish is generally served as roughly one-bite to two-bite sized pieces of vegetables (especially Japanese radish, a.k.a. daikon), tofu, meat, fish cakes, even whole eggs, all having been simmered in clear Japanese soup broth, or “dashi,” until the flavors have melded properly. For those liking a little spice, you can add hot yellow mustard for that extra kick.
Okonomiyaki
is a popular pan fried food that consists of batter and cabbage. Selected toppings and ingredients are added which can vary greatly (anything from meat and seafood to wasabi and cheese). This variability is reflected in the dish’s name; "okonomi" literally means "to one’s liking". The dish is available all over Japan, but is most popular in the west, particularly the cities of Osaka and Hiroshima.
Oyakodon
avoids asking the question, “Which came first, the chicken or the egg?” and just gives you both! Boneless chicken pieces are gently simmered in a broth that includes soy sauce, sake, and Japanese sweet rice wine. Once the chicken is cooked, lightly beaten egg is added to the mix for a final minute of so, just so the egg is barely cooked. This chicken and egg mix is then served in a bowl on top of white rice. “Oyakodon” means “parent and child rice bowl,” which is quite a clever name for the dish!
Sashimi
starts with a specially trained chef selecting the best cuts of generally raw fish or other seafood, slicing it into bite-sized pieces, then arranging it artfully on a platter. Common fish varieties include maguro (tuna) and hamachi (yellowtail), but can also include everything from giant clams to octopus (generally cooked). Shredded daikon, as well as an assortment of flavors to use in conjunction with your soy sauce, are provided. The wasabi should be dabbed on to the sashimi pieces sparingly so as to not overwhelm the fresh flavors of the sea. Sashimi is, above all, about celebrating the quality of the seafood, pure and simple.
Popular Restaurants
photo
Tsukiji Miyagawa Honten
つきじ宮川本廛
AreasShinjuku
CusinesUnaju (Unagi),Sashimi
photo
Sushi Ken
すし賢
AreasAsakusa
CusinesSashimi,Sushi
photo
Takara
たから
AreasGotanda
CusinesYakitori,Mizutaki
photo
Hinauo
日菜魚
AreasKayabacho
CusinesSashimi
photo
Hanba
飯場
AreasGinza
CusinesTonkatsu,Kushiage
photo
Onyasai Ebisu
温野菜 恵比寿
AreasEbisu
CusinesWagyu beef,Shabu-shabu
photo
Onyasai Mitaka
温野菜 三鷹
AreasMitaka
CusinesWagyu beef,Shabu-shabu
photo
Guenpin Fugu
玄品ふぐ 銀座
AreasGinza
CusinesFugu

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