What on Earth is a Thick Sweet ‘Cloudy Sake’?

Cloudy Sake – The Definition
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The transparent liquid that we all lovingly refer to as sake is made by putting the mash — produced by fermenting rice and turning it into alcohol — into sacks and applying pressure to separate the liquid from the cake (or lees).

Sometimes sacks with coarser material or a mesh with large holes in it is used. When this is the case, the milky sediment at the centre of the mash called ori also passes through with the liquid into the final product.

Cloudy sake is the type of sake with an audacious amount of ori in it.

Traits of Cloudy Sake
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The ori is made up of the koji malt and it’s broken down components and the yeast etc that have soaked into the mash, thus you really get a strong taste of the natural flavour of sake, which is, of course, all the savoury goodness of the rice itself.

Furthermore, a lot of cloudy sakes bypass the pasteurisation stage: the sake is bottled with the yeast alive in it, so there are plenty of sparkling champenoise (secondary fermentation) styles out there. At the same time, this type of sake tends to be easily susceptible to changes in flavour, so it has to be stored properly; it is best to finish the bottle as soon as possible after opening.

Recommended Ways to Enjoy Cloudy Sake
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The ori sediment settles at the bottom of the bottle, but a quick shake is it all it needs to mix it back up again. Note: be careful to check it is not one of the sparkling types before attempting this endeavour.

That being said, another way of enjoying cloudy sake is not to mix, leave the sediment at the bottom and enjoy just the upper clear bit. That way you can enjoy both parts separately.

Additionally, a lot of cloudy sakes are quite thick, and so probably best served over ice or with a dash of soda, perhaps even with some citrus fruits.

At KURAND SAKE MARKET we have prepared 6 different types of cloudy sake for you to try.
Every one of them is very different and offers different ways to enjoy them.

Original article: KURAND
What on Earth is a Thick Sweet ‘Cloudy Sake’?

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